History of The Mystery, from Poe to Present

The History of Mystery traces the progress of mysteries through the decades beginning with Edgar Allan Poe. Poe created the first detective story along with several other “firsts” for the genre. His writings inspired Agatha Christie and Arthur Conan Doyle who added techniques for developing a good mystery. Christie wrote during the Golden Age of Mysteries and belonged to the Detection Club which created specific rules for writing a mystery. These rules are still followed by today’s writers.

Britain may have had the Detection Club but America had the hard-boiled detective which was an integral part of the Pulp fiction era and influenced Film Noir. And let’s not forget today’s popular thrillers and their beginnings. In addition to examining the history of mystery, we’ll look at the influence Maryland had on the genre, both then and now.

Thursday, April 19, 2018
7:00 – 9:00
 
Owen Brown Community Center
6800 Cradlerock Way
Columbia, MD 21045

About the Speaker

Millie Mack writes the Faraday Murder Series featuring amateur sleuths Carrie and Charles Faraday. She also just completed her first culinary mystery for her new Irish Bistro Murder Series.

In addition to her books, Millie writes a blog all about mysteries at https://www.milliemack.com. The blog features mystery authors, detectives, and techniques. To challenge the reader’s mystery knowledge, there is an assortment of mystery puzzles.

Millie lives in the Baltimore area where she is working on the next book for her mystery series.

HoCo continues to collect new or gently-used books for HopeWorks. (The Howard County Domestic Violence Center.) All genres and age groups are needed, but due to the nature of their services, they request that the books contain no mention of violence against women or children.

You Only Debut Once

Local author Jenny Yacovissi shares some of what she learned in the run up to the release of her first novel, and in the aftermath. Understand why it’s crucial to know your publishing objectives, consider the pros and cons of small press publishing, learn how to make the most of the publication calendar, and find out what a publicist does. Be prepared to make the very most of your launch, because you only get one chance to have a first release.

Thursday, March 15, 2018
7:00 – 9:00
 
Owen Brown Community Center
6800 Cradlerock Way
Columbia, MD 21045

About the Speaker

JennyYacovissiJennifer Bort Yacovissi’s debut novel, Up the Hill to Home, tells the story of four generations of a family in Washington, DC, between the Civil War and the Great Depression. Jenny is a member of PEN/America and the National Book Critics’ Circle, and writes and reviews regularly for the Washington Independent Review of Books. She is the conference chair of the 2017 and 2018 Washington Writers Conference, and serves as the president of the Annapolis chapter of the MWA. You can follow Jenny’s blog at jbyacovissi.com, on Twitter @jbyacovissi and on Facebook: jenniferbortyacovissi

HoCo continues to collect new or gently-used books for HopeWorks. (The Howard County Domestic Violence Center.) All genres and age groups are needed, but due to the nature of their services, they request that the books contain no mention of violence against women or children.

Self-Publishing On Demand

Join Benjamin Franklin, Carl Sandburg, George Bernard Shaw, John Grisham, Margaret Atwood, Stephen King, Deepak Chopra and a growing number of authors who have self-published their works.

Eileen will discuss pros and cons of traditional vs print on demand (POD) publishing, how to begin, and crucial considerations for self-publishing. Eileen and her husband, Roger McIntire, established Summit Crossroads Press in 1994 to publish Roger’s parenting books. Its fiction imprint, Amanita Books, was begun in 2011. Since that time, they have published five editions of its popular book, Teenagers and Parents: 12 Steps to a Better Relationship, and many other books for parents, sold foreign rights for two of its books to publishers in eight other countries, and published five mysteries. SCP has also published four memoirs in its First Person History Series.

Thursday, February 15, 2018
7:00 – 9:00
 
Owen Brown Community Center
6800 Cradlerock Way
Columbia, MD 21045

About the Speaker

ElieenMcIntireEileen Haavik McIntire writes the 90s Club mystery series featuring the 90-year-olds at Whisperwood Retirement Village as well as an historical mystery series. She is currently president of the Maryland Writers’ Association and enthusiastic member of Sisters in Crime. She travels for research and has ridden a camel in the Moroccan Sahara, fished for piranhas in the Amazon, sailed in a felucca on the Nile, and lived on a motorsailer for three years. She and her husband live in Columbia, MD, with their little dog José.

HoCo continues to collect new or gently-used books for HopeWorks. (The Howard County Domestic Violence Center.) All genres and age groups are needed, but due to the nature of their services, they request that the books contain no mention of violence against women or children.

Creating Your Social Media Roadmap

With over half a dozen social media platforms out there, which one is right for you, how do you use it, how much time will it take you, and who is going to care? Rest assured: It doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, I’ll show you how to nail down the basics and create a social media strategy that works even while you sleep. This will be a hands-on workshop exploring the interplay of promotion, community, and automation.

Be sure to bring your questions – and a pen!

Thursday, January 18, 2018
7:00 – 9:00
 
Owen Brown Community Center
6800 Cradlerock Way
Columbia, MD 21045

About the Speaker

36033_1142201571091_6776510_nTiffany Carter is the Managing Director and resident Jane-of-all-Trades for NJA Productions. At the cross-sections of marketing, business development, and systems management she assists her clients in growing their creative ideas from inception to implementation to expansion.

 

HoCo continues to collect new or gently-used books for HopeWorks. (The Howard County Domestic Violence Center.) All genres and age groups are needed, but due to the nature of their services, they request that the books contain no mention of violence against women or children.

Open Mic Critique Group

mic 2

Writers are invited to bring selections of their work to read aloud and get feedback from group members. Please bring no more than 5 minutes worth of material to read. Contact us at mwahoco@marylandwriters.org to let us know you are planning to share . THIS IS THE LAST MEETING FOR 2017. Look forward to seeing you and again in 2018!

Thursday, October 19, 2017
7:00 – 9:00
 
Owen Brown Community Center
6800 Cradlerock Way
Columbia, MD 21045

HoCo continues to collect new or gently-used books for HopeWorks. (The Howard County Domestic Violence Center.) All genres and age groups are needed, but due to the nature of their services, they request that the books contain no mention of violence against women or children.

Analyzing Effective Writing

Analysis is the process of breaking something down into its component parts so as to study it in detail. How do we break down our writing? What makes writing effective? We will explore some answers to these questions by analyzing some specifically selected writing samples.

Thursday, September 21, 2017
7:00 – 9:00
 
Owen Brown Community Center
6800 Cradlerock Way
Columbia, MD 21045

About the Speaker

36033_1142201571091_6776510_nDonald McLean has been working as a software developer for almost thirty years, but has been reading almost since he was born. For many years he wanted to write, but never managed more than a few pages. One day a story idea appeared in his head, and wouldn’t let go until he wrote it down. He writes stories that are science fiction and/or fantasy but is, as yet, unpublished.

He has been happily married for thirty years; he and his wife have three grown children.

HoCo continues to collect new or gently-used books for HopeWorks. (The Howard County Domestic Violence Center.) All genres and age groups are needed, but due to the nature of their services, they request that the books contain no mention of violence against women or children.